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  • MACD Crossover

    File Name: MACDStrategy.efs

    Description:
    MACD Crossover

    Formula Parameters:


    Notes:
    MACD Ö Moving Average Convergence Divergence. The MACD is calculated
    by subtracting a 26-day moving average of a security's price from a
    12-day moving average of its price. The result is an indicator that
    oscillates above and below zero. When the MACD is above zero, it means
    the 12-day moving average is higher than the 26-day moving average.
    This is bullish as it shows that current expectations (i.e., the 12-day
    moving average) are more bullish than previous expectations (i.e., the
    26-day average). This implies a bullish, or upward, shift in the supply/demand
    lines. When the MACD falls below zero, it means that the 12-day moving average
    is less than the 26-day moving average, implying a bearish shift in the
    supply/demand lines.
    A 9-day moving average of the MACD (not of the security's price) is usually
    plotted on top of the MACD indicator. This line is referred to as the "signal"
    line. The signal line anticipates the convergence of the two moving averages
    (i.e., the movement of the MACD toward the zero line).
    Let's consider the rational behind this technique. The MACD is the difference
    between two moving averages of price. When the shorter-term moving average rises
    above the longer-term moving average (i.e., the MACD rises above zero), it means
    that investor expectations are becoming more bullish (i.e., there has been an
    upward shift in the supply/demand lines). By plotting a 9-day moving average of
    the MACD, we can see the changing of expectations (i.e., the shifting of the
    supply/demand lines) as they occur.


    Download File:
    MACDStrategy.efs



    EFS Code:
    PHP Code:
    /*********************************
    Provided By:  
        eSignal (Copyright c eSignal), a division of Interactive Data 
        Corporation. 2008. All rights reserved. This sample eSignal 
        Formula Script (EFS) is for educational purposes only and may be 
        modified and saved under a new file name.  eSignal is not responsible
        for the functionality once modified.  eSignal reserves the right 
        to modify and overwrite this EFS file with each new release.

    Description:        
        MACD Crossover
        
    Version:            1.0  10/15/2008

    Notes:
        MACD Ö Moving Average Convergence Divergence. The MACD is calculated 
        by subtracting a 26-day moving average of a security's price from a 
        12-day moving average of its price. The result is an indicator that 
        oscillates above and below zero. When the MACD is above zero, it means 
        the 12-day moving average is higher than the 26-day moving average. 
        This is bullish as it shows that current expectations (i.e., the 12-day 
        moving average) are more bullish than previous expectations (i.e., the 
        26-day average). This implies a bullish, or upward, shift in the supply/demand 
        lines. When the MACD falls below zero, it means that the 12-day moving average 
        is less than the 26-day moving average, implying a bearish shift in the 
        supply/demand lines.
        A 9-day moving average of the MACD (not of the security's price) is usually 
        plotted on top of the MACD indicator. This line is referred to as the "signal" 
        line. The signal line anticipates the convergence of the two moving averages 
        (i.e., the movement of the MACD toward the zero line).
        Let's consider the rational behind this technique. The MACD is the difference 
        between two moving averages of price. When the shorter-term moving average rises 
        above the longer-term moving average (i.e., the MACD rises above zero), it means 
        that investor expectations are becoming more bullish (i.e., there has been an 
        upward shift in the supply/demand lines). By plotting a 9-day moving average of 
        the MACD, we can see the changing of expectations (i.e., the shifting of the 
        supply/demand lines) as they occur.

    Formula Parameters:                     Default:

    **********************************/

    var bInit false;

    function 
    preMain() {
        
    setPriceStudy(false);
        
    setColorPriceBars(true);
        
    setDefaultPriceBarColor(Color.grey);
        
    setStudyTitle("MACD Strategy");
        
    setCursorLabelName("MACD"0);
        
    setCursorLabelName("SIGNAL"1);
        
    setDefaultBarFgColor(Color.blue0);
        
    setDefaultBarFgColor(Color.red1);
    }

    var 
    xMACD null;
    var 
    xSignal null;

    function 
    main() {

        if (
    bInit == false) {
            
    xMACD macd(81611);
            
    xSignal macdSignal(81611);
            
    bInit true;
        }

        if (
    getCurrentBarCount() < 16) return;
        if (
    getCurrentBarIndex() == 0) return;

        if(
    xSignal.getValue(0) < xMACD.getValue(0) && !Strategy.isLong()) {
            
    Strategy.doLong("Long"Strategy.CLOSE Strategy.NEXTBAR);
        }    

        if(
    xSignal.getValue(0) > xMACD.getValue(0) && !Strategy.isShort()) {
            
    Strategy.doShort("Short"Strategy.CLOSE Strategy.NEXTBAR);
        }    

        if(
    Strategy.isLong())
            
    setPriceBarColor(Color.lime);
        else if(
    Strategy.isShort())
            
    setPriceBarColor(Color.red);
                
        return new Array(
    xMACD.getValue(0), xSignal.getValue(0));

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